BOREHOLES

Kujali's initial projects involved commissioning boreholes in rural areas of Zimbabwe. The main source of water for the people living in these areas were rivers, usually a few kilometres walk away.


Women would walk to the river daily to collect water for drinking, cooking and washing. They would carry the water in buckets back to the village. This was hard work, and often resulted in insufficient water for daily activities. The river water is not safe for human consumption, and many illnesses arise from the use of this water. 

After much careful negotiation, Kujali funded the drilling and installation of boreholes in the rural areas of Zimbabwe:

The water eradicates water-borne killer diseases, provides irrigation to grow crops, and also sustains livestock during the hard dry season when rains are often very poor.

 

SHASHE, ZIMBABWE

October 2011

The rural area of Shashe is located in Eastern Zimbabwe. The area lies about 50km from the town of Masvingo,  25 km of which are on an almost unuseable dirt track. By any standards, this area is remote. There are three villages in Shashe, with a total population of about 500 people distributed as follows :

Village 1 : 24 homes with a total of 160 people
Village 2 : 33 homes with a total of 170 people
Village 3 : 35 homes with a total of 170 people

The people in Shashe are subsistence farmers, growing just about enough to survive. They rely on seasonal rains for irrigation. These rains do not always come. The main source of water for the people of Shashe was a river which is about 2.5 km away. Women would walk to the river daily to collect water for drinking, cooking and washing. They would carry the water in buckets back to the village. This was hard work, and often resulted in insufficient water for daily activities. The river water is not safe for human consumption, and many illnesses arise from the use of this water. Cholera is the most recent water borne disease, amongst others, that has affected Shashe.

St Theresa Hospital is a Catholic missionary hospital set up to provide medical facilities to the people of Shashe. Kujali learned of the people in Shashe, and their poor water situation, through contact with the staff at St Theresa's Hospital. Through this communication, contact was also made with a professional local company who install boreholes.

After much careful negotiation, Kujali funded the drilling and installation of a borehole at Shashe for the benefit of the villagers. The total cost of the project was USD 5700 and this money was sent from Kujali directly to the borehole company using a bank to bank telegraphic transfer. There was no middle man. All the money was used only for the comissioning of the borehole. The borehole at Sashe is 40m deep and is equipped with a Zimbabwe bush pump which is made locally using locally available parts, and operated manually.


The borehole has changed lives in Shashe. Clean water, and all the benefits that come with it, are now abundant. The villagers also plan to use the readily available water to irrigate larger agricultural plots to grow more fruits, grains and vegetables. The crops grown will provide both food and financial income to the families in Shashe.

 
 

GOVERE, ZIMBABWE

December 2011

The rural area of Govere is located in Eastern Zimbabwe. The area lies about 50km from the town of Masvingo, 25 km of which are on an almost unusable dirt track. By any standards, this area is remote. The village in Govere has a population of about 200 people distributed amongst 24 homes. The people in Govere are subsistence farmers, growing just about enough to survive. They rely on seasonal rains for irrigation. These rains do not always come. They own some livestock like cows and chickens. The main source of water for the people of Govere was a river which is about 3 km away. Women would walk to the river daily to collect water for drinking, cooking and washing. They would carry the water in buckets back to the village. This was hard work, and often resulted in insufficient water for daily activities. The river water is not safe for human consumption, and many illnesses arise from the use of this water. Cholera is the most recent water borne disease, amongst others, that has affected Govere.

    

St Theresa Hospital is a Catholic missionary hospital set up to provide medical facilities to the people of Shashe. Kujali learned of the people in Govere, and their poor water situation, through contact with the staff at St Theresa's Hospital. Through this communication, contact was also made with a professional local company who install boreholes. After much careful negotiation, Kujali funded the drilling and installation of a borehole at Govere for the benefit of the villagers.

The total cost of the project was USD 7553 and this money was sent from Kujali directly to the borehole company using a bank to bank telegraphic transfer. There was no middle man. All the money was used only for the comissioning of the borehole. The borehole at Govere is 60m deep and is equipped with a Zimbabwe bush pump which is made locally using locally available parts, and operated manually. The borehole has changed lives in Govere. Clean water, and all the benefits that come with it, are now abundant. The villagers also plan to use the readily available water to irrigate larger agricultural plots to grow more fruits, grains and vegetables. The crops grown will provide both food and financial income to the families in Govere.

 
 

HWATA, ZIMBABWE

February 2014

Hwata is an area in rural Zimbabwe, in the Midlands Province near Mvuma in the Churumhanzu District.

Hwata comprises of 8 villages and a primary school. There are approximately 1200 people living in the area. Until now, the only source of water for the 8 villages and primary school has been a well which is contaminated and unsafe. Out of no other choice, the people in Hwata have used this water for years. Many people have died from various waterborne illnesses. St Teresa's hospital has done much work to educate the people about boiling water to make it safe, but boiling water required firewood which is very expensive. The well is also seasonal. If the rains are poor, the water level drops and makes the task of acquiring clean water a lot more difficult.

In February 2014, Kujali comissioned a new borehole near Hwata School. This borehole provides the 1200 people living in the 8 villages and primary school in Hwata, with clean and safe water, a commodity that is so often taken for granted in the UK. The water eradicates water-borne killer diseases, provides irrigation to grow crops, and also sustains livestock during the hard, dry season when rains are often very poor. Hwata School uses the borehole water to grow vegetables to provide supplementary feeds for the pupils.

 
 

RUPWEPWE, ZIMBABWE

May 2016

Rupwepwe Primary School is located in Chirumanzu district in rural Zimbabwe, in the Midlands Province near Mvuma.

Kujali has commissioned a borehole to serve the primary school and communities living in the area.

There was serious need for clean and safe water at this site for both the school community and the surrounding villages. Both the school and the community were relying on shallow wells which dry up due to the severe drought conditions currently being experienced country wide. The nearest clean water source was 8km from the school leading to teacher transfers due to hardships in getting clean and safe water. Shortage of water to the school was posing a health threat as pupils would have no water for sanitary purposes. The borehole distance from school is 600m. Drilling was implemented down to 50m. Drilling started on the 19th of April 2016 and was completed on the same day. Bush-pump installation was completed on the 25th of April 2016.

The water eradicates water-borne killer diseases, provides irrigation to grow crops, and also sustains livestock during the hard dry season when rains are often very poor. Rupwepwe School uses the borehole water to grow vegetables to provide supplementary feeds for the pupils.

 
 

MACHEKERE, ZIMBABWE

May 2016

Machekere Village is located in Chirumhanzu district in rural Zimbabwe, in the Midlands Province near Mvuma.

Kujali has commissioned a borehole to serve the village and communities living in the area. The site at Machekere is central and can serve Govere Primary School, Bhoroma Business Centre and several villages in the surrounding areas. This site has plenty of water that can be used for other bigger projects such as medium sized irrigation and nutritional gardens. The community has already proposed the establishment of three nutritional gardens but the major set-back is that the community is very poor and does not have enough money for fencing material to keep wild animals away from the gardens. This is an ongoing challenge. The borehole drilling was done up to 55m. Drilling started on the 20th of April 2016 and was completed on the same day. Bush-pump installation was done on the 26th of April 2016.

The water eradicates water-borne killer diseases, provides irrigation to grow crops, and also sustains livestock during the hard dry season when rains are often very poor.

 
 

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